My Latest: The Aberrant Lives of Damian Callahan

My latest book The Aberrant Lives of Damian Callahan is now available at Amazon (and other outlets to follow).

The 50-word summary goes like this:

Damian Callahan suffers a head injury that leads to a diagnosis of terminal brain cancer, and sets out on a quixotic journey to pursue the woman of his dreams—a woman who might be a figment of his imagination, only to discover the truth about his life and his death.

If you click on the cover below you can find out more.

This short novel came out of an event I experienced in the summer before seventh grade. Parents tell us never to get into cars with strangers, like the one who in the 1970s pulled to a stop in front of me while I sat on my bike waiting for a traffic light to change. I didn’t get into the man’s car. Every year, some children are not so lucky.

From time to time I always wondered about the “what if” scenario concerning the situation that had happened to me. Would I have survived? Would I have ever seen my family again?

Damian Callahan, the protagonist in my new novel, is not me. He is, however, with all of his flaws, a creation of the “what if” scenario from my own life.

Ordinarily, I don’t offer much in the way of trigger warnings for my work. With this novel, I’m making an exception. Anyone who may have suffered sexual trauma as an adolescent should read The Aberrant Lives of Damian Callahan with caution.

Drop me a line at obrien1writer@gmail.com and let me know what you think about the novel, leave a review, or both. Thanks so much.

A Small Taste of Little Flower of Luzon

Please enjoy a small taste of Little Flower of Luzon. If you are interested in purchasing your own copy a link to my book will follow:

The following evening, on Friday, I drove directly from work to Dillinger’s Bookstore. When I went inside Priya was at her perch thumbing through a copy of Heidegger’s Being and Time. I knew nothing about the German philosopher; even less, it seemed these days, about how both being and time caused me so much anguish. Priya’s eyes remained fixed on me the moment I stepped through the door. Her expression, the heavy-lidded grave veneer that was her face, appeared as if she were ready to deliver some bad news.

“Good book?” I asked.

“That depends,” she replied.

“On what?” I took the bait.

I couldn’t take looking at Priya’s face for too long. Instead, my gaze settled upon her braless breasts beneath her cream-colored tee shirt.

“What you mean by good,” she answered.

The last thing I needed that evening was to get into a philosophical debate with Salman Rushdie’s female doppelganger…

Little Flower of Luzon and Little Flower of Luzon Kindle Edition

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